Crime Survivors’ Profiles

The following are our available speakers on issues related to victims/survivors of crime. Please fill out this form if you would to request a speaker.

Adela Barajas (Los Angeles)
David Guizar (Los Angeles)
Vicky Lindsey (Los Angeles)
Deldelp Medina (Bay Area)
Tom Rudderow (Bay Area)
Sonya Shah (Bay Area)
Aqeela Sherrills (Los Angeles)
Dionne Wilson (Silicon Valley)
Kathy Young-Hood (Bay Area)

Adela Barajas (Los Angeles)

In 2007, Adela’s sister-in-law – a mother of four and a cherished member of the family – was killed in a random drive-by-shooting outside her Los Angeles home. Adela became a source of support for Laura’s children and went on to help individuals and communities affected by violence turn their experiences into more positive outcomes.

Adela (who speaks English and Spanish fluently) has appeared on CNN, local TV and radio news programs, and in the Los Angeles Times. She has also been a speaker at local and national conferences.

David Guizar (Los Angeles)

When David was 10 years old in 1983, his older brother – and idol – was murdered. No one told him what happened, and David struggled in his teen years with fear and anger about the loss. After decades of drug and alcohol addiction, David became clean and sober. Then in 2012, another brother was killed while attempting to stop a stranger from entering a wedding party. David helped his family navigate this ordeal and has developed first-hand expertise in what needs – often unmet or hard to meet – people have after experiencing trauma. He is now the volunteer Chair of the Leadership Team for Crime Survivors for Safety and Justice.

Vicky Lindsey (Los Angeles)

In 1995, Vicky’s 19-year-old son was shot and killed while leaving a high school football game. His murderer was never caught. To prevent other parents from experiencing the same loss, Vicky runs Project Cry No More, a nonprofit that provides emotional support and information about “living through, not getting over” a loved one who has fallen victim to violence. She is a poet and has been interviewed by various news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times.

Deldelp Medina (Bay Area)

In 2005, Deldelp’s family was rocked when her cousin murdered her aunt (his mother) after suffering a mental breakdown. Knowing their relative needed treatment for schizophrenia, the family became his defense team. They convinced the District Attorney to drop the death penalty and instead place the young man in a mental health facility, where he remains today.

Deldelp now works with victims in the Bay Area. She speaks English and Spanish and has been interviewed by publications (e.g.,San Francisco Chronicle), local radio and numerous Spanish-language radio and TV programs.

Tom Rudderow (Bay Area)

In 2006, Tom was walking to the train station at night in San Leandro. Four young men pulled him off the sidewalk, beat him and took his belongings. He awoke from a coma days later and has struggled since with memory loss, headaches and dizziness. His attackers were caught, and the main instigator went to prison. Tom decided that forgiveness was the only way to make something meaningful out of the experience, and his letter to the young man changed both of their lives. Tom also passionately advocates for better trauma support for victims after a violent crime.

Sonya Shah (Bay Area)

At the age of 4, Sonya was sexually assaulted multiple times by a male caretaker. At age 23, what started as a normal night out with a male friend ended in rape. Both experiences traumatized Sonya but also inspired and informed her work to better understand the root causes of violence and better forms of accountability and healing after a crime takes place.

Sonya previously worked in public radio and television and has extensive experience speaking at conferences, public events, universities and in front of national and international bodies.

Aqeela Sherrills (Los Angeles)

In 2004, Aqeela’s 18-year-old son was shot and killed by a stranger while home from college on winter break. The shooter mistook the young man’s Mickey Mouse sweater for representing gang colors. Aqeela turned this tragedy into a full-time effort to reduce violence and increase the healing opportunities for individuals and communities affected by violence. He is a regular speaker at community events and other venues and has extensive experience speaking with the media. See a video about Aqeela here.

Dionne Wilson (Silicon Valley)

In 2005, Dionne’s husband, a police officer in San Leandro, was shot and killed while responding to a disturbance call. Raising two young children and stricken with grief, Dionne struggled in the months that followed. Though her husband’s shooter was caught, true solace came when Dionne began helping other victims heal and promoting smarter justice policies. She has been interviewed by newspapers, TV and radio, and watch this inspiring video of her here.

Kathy Young-Hood (Bay Area)

When Kathy’s son was shot and killed in 2004, she didn’t think she could go on. She considered suicide – regularly. But the help she received at San Francisco’s Trauma Recovery Center (which streamlines various victim services and focuses on the healing needed to rebound from traumatic crimes) gave her the strength and a purpose to go on. Today she is an eloquent speaker – in the media and at the Center – about the benefits of the trauma center model and other victim needs.

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